Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Legal History at SHEAR

The annual meeting of the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic (SHEAR) convenes this week (July 17-20) in Philadelphia. Here's a sampling of the legal history offerings (the full program is available here):

FAITH, POLITICS, AND LAW AFTER THE FOUNDING
PRESIDING: Christopher Grasso, College of William and Mary

The African Supplement: Corporate Law, Race, and Religion in Early National Philadelphia
Sarah Barringer Gordon, University of Pennsylvania

The Founders Speak: Spiritualist Visitations from the Revolutionary Generation in the Mid-Nineteenth Century
Ryan K. Smith, Virginia Commonwealth University

The Myth of American Religious Coercion: The New Nation’s Un-official Religious Establishment and Its Paradoxes
Chris Beneke, Bentley University
COMMENTS: Mary Kupiec Cayton, Miami University; Christopher Grasso

BOUNDARIES OF CITIZENSHIP IN THE NEW AMERICAN REPUBLIC
PRESIDING: Douglas Bradburn, Binghamton University

The Loyalist Problem in New York and Pennsylvania
Brett Palfreyman, Binghamton University

The Argument against Confiscation in South Carolina and New York
Tom Cutterham, New College, Oxford University

Native Citizenship, Sovereignty, and the Law of Nations in the New Republic
Greg Ablavsky, University of Pennsylvania Law School
“Creating an Order of Citizens”: Black Northerners and Civic Status in the Early Republican North
Sarah Levine-Gronningsater, University of Chicago
COMMENT: Holly Brewer, University of Maryland

THE SOUTH AMERICAN QUESTION IN THE EARLY REPUBLIC: DIPLOMACY, STATE BUILDING, AND POLITICAL ECONOMY
PRESIDING: Brian Rouleau, Texas A&M University

Contracted Weaponry: The Law of Nations and the U.S.-Latin American Arms Trade, 1793-1818
Andrew Fagal, Binghamton University
Edward Pompeian, College of William and Mary

“An universal alteration in the commercial relations of the universe”: U.S. Political Economy and South America, ca. 1815-1825
Martin Öhman, University of Virginia

“Anywhere where we have diplomatic powers we can affect regulation”: Managing New Markets in an Age of Latin American Revolutions, 1810-1830
Lindsay Schakenbach, Brown University
COMMENTS: Andrew Shankman, Rutgers University at Camden; Brian Rouleau

WOMEN AND PROPERTY IN EARLY AMERICA
PRESIDING: Kirsten E. Wood, Florida International University
“Great Value in the Personal Property Here”: Elite Women’s Ownership in Early National New York City
Alisa Wade Harrison, The Graduate Center, City University of New York

“The consideration due to him as the head of his family”: Hostility to Women’s Separate Estates in the Early National South
Lindsay Keiter, College of William and Mary

Widows and Waste: Disputing Dower Rights in Early National New Jersey
Eleanor McConnell, Frostburg State University

COMMENTS: Stephen A. Mihm, University of Georgia; Kirsten E. Wood
UPDATE:

One more, from the session titled PECHA-KUCHA (to inspire a lively atmosphere, bringing a drink from the bar is encouraged)
Unrolling the Past: Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Petitions
Nicole Topich, Harvard University

 Did we miss anything? Leave a comment of send us an email and we'll update the post.

1 comment:

Nicole said...

There will also be "Unrolling the Past: Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Petitions" during the Pecha Kucha session on Friday at 4pm.